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Resveratrol Preserves Hippocamal area in Atherosclerosis-prone Lupus Mice: A Potential Neurolupus Treatment
Saba Ahmed1, 2, Kiana Cruz1, Steven E. Carsons3, Joshua DeLeon3, Allison B. Reiss1, Lora J. Kasselman1. 1Biomedial Research, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Middletown, New York, United States, 2Adelphi University, Garden City, New York, United States, 3Department of Medicine, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, New York, United States

Purpose of Study Neuropsychiatric lupus (NP-SLE) is a sequelae of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) characterized by neurologic and psychiatric manifestations including cognitive dysfunction, seizures, and anxiety. Additionally, in SLE patients, the risk of cardiovascular complications such as atherosclerosis is much greater than in the general population. The cognitive changes involved in NP-SLE may be the result of the interaction between chronic inflammation and vascular disease.

Previously, the polyphenolic compound resveratrol, found naturally in grapes and berries, was shown by our group to have neuroprotective effects in atherosclerosis-prone lupus mice (APOE/Fas double knockout). Results indicated that resveratrol improved working memory, and motor coordination in these mice. The goal of this study was to observe any cellular or anatomical correlations between the preceding behavioral findings and areas of the brain; specifically the hippocampus. We hypothesize that brain tissue of mice treated with resveratrol would exhibit characteristics associated with improved cognitive function.
Methods Used Frozen brain sections were fixed and stained using hematoxylin and eosin to visualize cells within the regions of interest. The tissues were then examined and photographed using a light microscope and digital camera. Using ImageJ, bilateral hippocampi were outlined and the area quantified across 3 different treatment groups: 1 - APOE/Fas untreated; 2 - APOE/Fas + resveratrol; 3 - APOE/Fas + resveratrol + adenosine A2a blocker.
Summary of Results Preliminary results show that hippocampal area in the atherosclerosis-prone lupus mice treated with resveratrol is significantly larger than in control untreated and adenosine A2a blockade groups combined (p=0.0014; n=5-7 per group).
Conclusions These results correspond with prior behavioral data showing that resveratrol treated mice had the highest working memory performance. In conjunction with the current anatomical data, there may be preservation of hippocampal neurons as a result of resveratrol treatment,and, since A2a ligation is known to be neuroprotective, this effect may be mediated via the A2a receptor. Confirmatory analyses are planned.


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